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CNN
Dec 2, 2012 10:00am PST
on his fascinating new book. >>> and the next phase of europe's crisis. which nations might find themselves split apart. i'll explain. >>> first, here is my take. arafat's body has been exhumed for investigation. bringing back memories of the unpredictable palestinian leader. the news broke at a time when a conventional wisdom has begun to take hold that the middle east today is much more dangerous, unstable, violent and anti-american than before. let's take a look at facts. in the 1980s the newly empowered radical islamic republic of iran unsettled the region with its promise to spread its revolution elsewhere. lebanon was in the midst of a bloody civil war. that engulfed itself and the palestinians and israel. iran and iraq fought a gruesome war with over one million casualties. hezbollah attacked u.s. armed forces directly forcing a humiliating withdrawal from lebanon. a cia station chief was tortured and killed, and u.s. secrets and interests compromised, and that was just in one decade. or consider those days from israel's point of view. during the 1980s, jerusalem faced wel
CNBC
Dec 21, 2012 6:00pm EST
in europe compared to america? is that just an example of you weren't disciplined in europe and you got a lot of business? i'm trying to understand. europe is harder right now than america. >> exactly. that underscores the point that what we do nobody else can do. we want to make the offer when your wallet is out of your pocket not six months after you leave the store. you can go look in the filing cabinet that oracle or s.a.p. or microsoft has and that's the 20th century. we're all about doing things in realtime. we make you that offer when your wallet is out and your credit card is in your hand. nobody else can do that. that's a universal big data realtime problem that only tibco can solve. >> you mentioned oracle and s.a.p. and analysts that i checked in with say that ibm has come on very strong. >> ibm is our strongest competitor. we beat them every single time in terms of technical performance. they do have strong relationships and at the end of the day we have to be three years ahead of the competition and we believe we are. >> okay. you had 25 deals that were over 1 million.
FOX Business
Dec 8, 2012 12:00am EST
export lng offshore to europe, and or asia and to other countries that need our gas. melissa: we have so much natural gas unlocked as a result of fracking, the problem is, intellectually, emotionally we can never wrap our heads on exporting energy. we're sure we have to keep it all for fraaking,ç problem isç intellectually wrap our heads aroundzv exporting energy. weypúre sure to keep itç all for ourselves.ç do you think the president andç washington in general cansget over that hurdle.ç >> it is a great pointç, what you're describeç something protectionism.zvçmyv it could be a cake and eat it too scenario. within eight years or now seven years as we turn into the new 2013 year it could be $50 billion economic impact to this country. so we're tripping over dollars to try to save pennies. weemight be able to impact the ecomy here. melissa: i know but, you know, there is so much of the country, there are so many environmentalists so many people on the left who hate generating energy. they barely wt us t generate enough energy to el our own economy and much less more and
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00pm EST
were desperate for the united states to open up the second front to western europe and the british. roosevelt's stalin to send molotov the top general to washington in may of 42 and in june of 40 to the united states issued a public statement saying we are going to open up the second front before the end of the war, before the end of the year 1942. we promise that publicly and get we don't open up the second front until june of 44 and that is partly because the british refused to go along with this. the united states and the british get involved in what marshall calls peripheral and marshall and eisenhower opened up a second front and the united states when instead to basically defend the british empire. there was going to be a lot of mistrust between the united states and the soviets particularly during the war. the seeds of the cold war actually are visible during the war. in certain tensions of course because the second front is the soviets had on their own and largely defeated the germans after stalingrstalingr ad and for pushing toward central europe and eastern europe. said t
CNBC
Dec 17, 2012 12:00pm EST
about for several months now. i think europe the data points are getting no worse. i think that could be source for upside for 2013. imagine if you get this unknown here in the states plus all of this global liquidity. i think it's very powerful and positive. >> steve weiss, tepper whom i know that you know well says the obvious. in that d.c. could screw it all up for the near term but says the fed's still there, our economy is improving. you've got the ecb with his words a put under the market as well. >> the only place i won't agree with dave is on the golf course. because i know i'm a better player than he is. in terms of the market, he's been laying it out this way for awhile. let's face it, aside from renaissance technology, he has the best long-term track record of any fund manager out there. not just hedge funds but i generally defer to genius like that. that means he gives me a few more strokes the next time we play. >> i know it's painful for you. >> it's very painful. you're flush with liquidity. the issues continue to be, and i think one of the things, they may be worried abou
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 8:30am EST
treaty, or inf, led to the destruction of thousands of europe-based nuclear missiles on both sides. speakers here will include former assistant secretary of state richard burt, former u.s. ambassador to the soviet union, jack matlock, and will also there from former assistant secretary of state rozanne ridgway. the american foreign service association posted this hour and 20 minute event. >> i would like to wish all other good morning. one. i'm susan johnson, the president and i would like to extend a very warm welcome to you all. and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion. and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing of the historic treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, ambassadors matlock, ridgeway and bert, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounded the complex negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing dangers of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three imminent folks but i would just like to say a quick word. about the ridge was assistant s
FOX Business
Dec 27, 2012 4:00pm EST
think europe is behind us. unemployment is finding its footing. the housing market is finding its footing. so i think generally we have got clear sailing for 2013. i don't think the market is going to skyrocket. i just don't think we're going to see the wild swings that we have seen the last couple of years. david: david, let me challenge you on that a little bit. tim, we will get to you in a second. you say most of the bad news is behind us, but what if we don't have a deal, and that's still a possibility, we go off the fiscal cliff and as most economists think, we go into a recession. i mean a recession is not priced into this market, is it? >> i think so. david: really? hold on a second, the last time we had a recession the dow went down. >> i don't think there's really many things they can do in congress to avoid a very slow growth economy. whatever they do, it is not going to cause the economy to grow like crazy. i don't think the market is pricing any any kind of major reversal. david: let me be precise here. you are saying specifically that if we go into a recession, a rece
NBC
Dec 18, 2012 3:00am EST
place to invest in. more companies would prefer to expand in asia than here, or even europe that i talk to. the bountiful energy found in america, all of the natural gas and all that stuff, i can think of just three companies taking advantage of it. and that's talking about exporting it. the partnership sign. a 20-year agreement with total today, cqp is the symbol there. the real problem is in the exporting of the cheaper, cleaner fuel that is natural gas. not burning it here. or manufacturing with it. the industrial renaissance as i've been telling you, as much as it just breaks my heart, is stillborn. it's not getting better. retail's a real worry. i think we've fallen off a gift cliff. so few companies i know are doing well this holiday season. it is looking like a total bust. courtesy of sandy, incredibly warm weather and, of course, the fear engendered by the serious issue that is the fiscal cliff. i see that weakness and i'm not crazy about these stocks, in general. but i think that the conclusion of the housing crisis is upon us. which means there will be more money going to
CNBC
Dec 19, 2012 11:00pm EST
. and i've got to tell you, that's got to change in 2013. then there's europe. today, just today, i am wearing a tie that commemorates a brilliant strategy. one which works so amazingly that i'm still dazzled by it. what's happening on this tie? it's a man, a man in a suit kicking a can down the road. you see, while the europeans were kicking the can, they gave themselves time to develop a plan to allow governments and banks to raise capital and fix their respective balance sheets at lower levels than anyone thought possible. coming into the year, you know what my number one worry was? we believe that every time italy and spain would have to raise money, go to the debt markets, do those deals, interest rates would shoot through the roof, bankrupting all involved, sovereign countries, companies, banks. instead, by letting cooler heads prevail through can kicking, smart private sector investors kicked the tires, not the cans, and they bought the debt. hit home runs every time they did. as rates came down hard, courtesy of central bank backstops that really did work. the europeans real
CNBC
Dec 12, 2012 4:00am EST
french and german banks. had we gone bankrupt last year, europe would have ended. so they sent in monty to manage the situation in order for the german and french banks to get their money back. the ucb printed out -- ecb print out money used to help our banks but do not use it to finance our businesses. they give it to them buy to see buy back their debt to help french and german banks. that was monty's work. and in the meantime, our debt went up. >> reporter: and by the way, the five-star movement is number two in the polls. but he's not really a politician. he is a comedian. not kidding. he actually is a comedian. we also managed to catch up with the politician who's more serious about becoming the next prime minister, who has 30% of the votes in the latest polls, his name is mr. bercani. you know him. we'll show you that in the next hour. now it is time for your "global markets report." >>> all right. thank you very much. we are slightly weighted to the upside here. the european equity grind-up rally continues. advances outpaced decliners about 5-4. the dow jones 600, the ftse
FOX Business
Dec 17, 2012 9:20am EST
. coming up new at 10, germany's chancellor angela merkel says europe will have to work very hard to it maintain its current standard of living. at the top of the hour, find out what she's saying about welfare and here is another development from overseas. we brought you the story last week, french actor gerard depardu, he is leaving home, leaving france because of higher taxes and handed in his passport. now, the french prime minister has some choice words for mr. depardu. he's obviously in the happy with him and find out exactly what he said at ten o'clock eastern time this morning. time is money. 30 seconds, here is what else we've got for you, an in japan, again, a landslide win, so, what's the new prime minister going to do about the world's worst debt problem? print more money and stimulate more, too. build more infrastructure. will that work? we have our own resident japan expert. question, is jeff immelt's cozy relationship with the president costing general electric shareholders money? we will be discussing it. and i lost on friday when i questioned "the washington po " post
CNBC
Dec 31, 2012 4:00am EST
markets are closed. the rest of markets look a little bit like this. here is europe to begin with. only a few markets are open there today. among those closed include spain and germany. we're start with asia. shanghai composite is the outperformer. you saw up 1.6% there. here is a list of the markets closed across europe. germany, switzerland, germany and austria. for the bourses that are open, we can take a look at performance this morning and then we'll take a look over at the bond wall. the ftse 100 is down about .4%. ibex down .5%. not a clear picture. definitely mixed trade as people look to close out the year. the bond wall gives the sense for what kind of wall dominates. we're seeing bond yields move higher. investors are exiting the asset class today. italy around the 4.5% level. we've seen these predominant for several weeks and likely a quick check on forrus. the yen, an important one to keep an eye on, as well. dollar/yen firmer, continuing the patterns that we've seen over the last couple of trading sessions. for more on what to expect from markets today, we're joined
PBS
Dec 14, 2012 1:00am PST
having southern europe slip into the mediterranean. and so also given other asset classes equities appear to be relatively attractive. >> let's talk about that, actually. because did you ask the people that you survey what are the best asset classes. and stocks got-- was at the top of the list. let's look at the list here, followed by precious metals, commodities, bonds and cash at the bottom of the list. tell us a little bit pore about those rankings from investment managers? >> sure. and these are charter financial analysts that we survey, our members. they spend their time in the markets investing. and compared to last year, there is more pessimism about the prospect it's for bonds, for fixed income given the very low nominal level of yields. and also for cash where basically you can't get any return. so equities were the clear favorite with over 50% of our respondents saying that they would be the best asset class. >> there is still some pessimism about europe, primarily coming from respondents, our members there. but there's more open coming from-- optimistic from charter fina
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 8:00pm EST
. jobs are lost. so there is a similarity with what is happening in europe and what could happen here if we don't get our house in order. >> you talked about a single- minded focus, yet you are leaving with jobs undone. how do you feel about leaving at this particular point in time? >> we still have several weeks. we have laid out the plans and all these efforts i have been part of and other efforts as well. i still have some optimism that we will get this job done. one of the reasons i did not run again is the really wanted to focus these last two years. i knew if i was running, i would not be able to be in the hundreds of hours of negotiations i have been in. i believe many of the ideas we have generated will be part of any solution, whether it comes before the end of this year or early next year. i believe the work product we have produced will be part of the solution. >> you talked about no longer missing a 80% of family birthdays. what will you be doing then? >> i will be doing some speaking and doing some teaching. i have people starting to talk to me about other opportunit
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 6:00pm EST
between. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britain had been paying for more than 70 years. it amounted to next to nothing for the average citizen, a pepny or two or a stamp attached to legal documents, publications, and the packages of non-essential products like playing cards. the harshest effects of this tax, however, were on members of three po
CNN
Dec 6, 2012 3:00am EST
weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe. look at japan. look at the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. it hasn't protected us. it has resulted in arguments that should have a consequence of maybe a slap in the face, resulting in a bullet through the heart. it results in a double-murder in this case, a murder/suicide. guns don't protect. they cause suicide. >> let me bring in -- >> they cause suicide? >> i can promise, i'll get back to you, carol. here is what they say to me. i've had it all. but trying to get a debate going. i've been on two years on cnn. in that time, there's been a series of gun rages. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11,000 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. by comparison, britain has 35 as does germany and australia. japan has one or two. to countries that have strict gun control have very little gun murder. what do you say to americans who say it makes me feel safe? >> i think carole had it right. she said it is abou
CNBC
Dec 18, 2012 4:00am EST
normally on boosting growth. >>> well, it's been a rel ofly good year for stocks in europe. adding about .3%. advancers mostly outpacing decliners on the index this morning. if we can zero in on the bourses, it's largely green behind me. the fits fits mib is atting .6%. the ibex in spain, up 0.8%. and the ftse up about 0.3%. now, some company-specific news this morning, fin mechanica saying shares up 2.4%. this on news they're set to buy sge-avio. safran is also a company considering that change. let's take a quick look at the bond space. we'll get a sense of the kind of trade we're seeing shaping up. it is consistent with flows into the periphery, perhaps out of the core and the risk on move generally that we're seeing this morning. yields up to 4.5 roughly in italy at about 5.4%, respectively. gilt is moving up towards is.9% this morning. the bund yield is still extremely low, so that spread between gilt and bund is widening. look at the euro/dollar. 1 1.3171. extraordinary. we're almost up at that 1.32 level. the dollar/yen is flat, right about 83.88. there we go. a little bit o
CNN
Dec 9, 2012 3:00pm EST
headed our way partly because of europe and this fiscal lif, but i've also told you about an american economic renaissance that could be just ahead. just beyond the storm clouds. the fiscal cliff is fixable, but every day washington fails to make a deal, more damage is being doing. john king, ken rogoff and diane swan, chief economist at mezaro financial. john, right now, this is more politics than the economy. some people are saying don't sweat it. the threat of going over the fiscal cliff is overblown. it will get done. an 11th hour deal. john, as you read the politics at play, what do you see? >> i see both sides digging in. you've just played the president saying i want that rate hike. the republicans are saying mr. president, we'll give you the revenues, but not through a rate hike, but the president believes he won the election and he's upped the ante. says he wants twice as much in tax revenues than a year and a half ago, so the president believes he has the higher ground. i think maybe the democrats have a deeper trench, if you will. they have public on their side. but if you
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 11:30pm EST
charitable purposes in europe. it is very difficult to give service in europe. when i was asking people, they said, why would we serve? there is a bureau for that. there are some places in europe burk it is illegal to give volunteer service. as i see the united states going in the same trend of all sourcing -- outsourcing, it is so overregulated and so over controlling of your life, it takes away your freedom to even support yourself, how would you propose the government relinquished power is that it has taken over peacefully? how do you think the government would be able to let go of this control of our lives? >> i agree with every syllable you just said. [laughter] you almost provoked me to be more political than i felt comfortable doing in this chapel. leave more space, more breathing room for civil society. this astonishing combustion of voluntary association. in my remarks, i used the analogy of a tree. in the shade of which, smaller things cannot grow. that is the danger of an excess of state. >> [inaudible] how can we get them to take the laws out? [applause] >> we are almost out
CNBC
Dec 14, 2012 4:00pm EST
support, and we'd be in big trouble without $1 trillion in stimulus. in europe the stimulus stopped working in 2012. in 2013 the stimulus is just not going to make an impact. these more wealthy people that will be spending will be hit by more taxes and they will slow down and i think that you're going to see the economy be much worse in 2013, but, you know, we may get more stimulus first in china and europe so i think it's going to be see-saw first half of 2013 and then i think the markets will head down seriously in the second half of 2013. >> but, again, to his point, the wealthy includes savers, both corporate and individuals, grandma and grand past the fed is killing them. >> killing them. >> so if we don't reball the equation, i don't think we'll make any progress. >> very, very important insights. gentlemen, appreciate it. >> happy new year. >> let's hope it's a happy one, guys. thank you. >>> meanwhile, dallas federal reserve president richard fisher saying congress should borrow a book from its playbook to strike a deal on the fiscal cliff. >> we get things done. we make a d
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 11:00am EST
could overrun europe in two weeks, he wrote in the margin, i doubt. it took us three months just to take this on. when the spending request came in, ike would say i know those boys down at the pentagon. ike believed the real national security came from a sound economy. he was a deficit hawk. he controlled government spending and package. his famous speech warning against military-industrial complex came at the end of his presidency but, in fact, he been working on it all a long. mostly behind the scenes. heaven help us, he liked to say, that we'll get a president who knows less about the military than i do. this approach to the military was not just about the economy. in the berlin crisis in 58-59 and in early crisis with korea and vietnam in 1953, 54, the almost straight, the suez crisis in 1956, eisenhower was playing a bigger game for higher stakes. a west point cadet and a young army officer, ike had been a great poker player. indeed, he was so good that he had to give it up. he was taking too much money from his fellow officers and it was hurting his career. he switched to brid
CNBC
Dec 20, 2012 5:00pm EST
smaller place. we supported the marshall plan that helped europe regain its strength. and pioneered the atm, so you can get cash when you want it. it's been our privilege to back ideas like these, and the leaders behind them. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping people and their ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ >>> you said repeatedly, at one point, you said, if you succeed, you're going to be donating the money to charity. you called it blood money. >> yes. i don't want to make money off of this. >> because? >> i just -- it's not a happy thing. you've had millions of low income people around the world who gotten their hopes up that there's an opportunity for them to become millionaires or hundred thousand-aires or something like that and they've been duped. >> that was big ackman earlier today. shares of herbalife have tumbled roughly 21% since cnbc first reported on a short position in yesterday's session. dr. jay, when you heard he was donating the money to charity, you said, tha
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 12:00am EST
desperate for the united states to open up a second front in western europe, and the british and roosevelt asked stalin to send molotov, a top general to washington in may i've '42, and june of '42 the united states said we are going to enup a second front before the end of the year in 1942. we promised that publicly and yet we don't open the second front until underof '44 and that's bass the british refused to go along with this and the united states and the british get involved in what marshall called periphery pecking in northern africa. marshall and eisenhower were serious. >> how did this lead to the cold war? >> because it led to a lot of mistrust between the united states and the soviets beginning -- the seeds of the colored war are visible during the war. and certain tension because the fact there was a second front, meant that the soviets had on their own to see that the german s -- were pushing across central europe and moving toward berlin, so we lost the military mission and on to diplomatic so there are doles being made between churchill and stalin of -- >> dividing up -- >> y
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 9:00pm EST
after -- africa campaign, d-day, germany, and liberation of europe. ike smoked four packs a day as a general, quit cold turkey in 1949. he gave himself an order to quit, he said. he had a heart attack in 1955, and operation in 1956, a small stroke in 1957, doctors worried about the blood pressure and ordering him to worry less. what do they they the job is, he said? he tried to relax playing golf. he played 800 times as president, a record, but golf was the wrong game for a perfectionist. he was grim on the course, and once through a chipping wedge at a doctor, howard snyder, when snyder tried to make him feel better about a shot from the bunker. he had a tumper. his mother would quote the bible saying he the conquer their own soul is greater than he who takes a city. ike would say his mother taught him how to control the temper. one of the aids said i thought what a poor job she had done. [laughter] when he was mad, he was like tearing into a steel furnace said an aide. he had trouble sleeping, and towards the end, took too many sleeping pills and an extra drink of too, worn out in
CNN
Dec 23, 2012 12:00pm PST
, we're the cleanest dirty shirt. we're not clean, but we are cleaner than europe is right now. so we haven't felt it. my main worry is the following. if the republicans and the democrats can't get together to solve the fiscal cliff, then you will need an external force, you will need major market selloff. you will need a major economic trauma to get them to focus. >> there are other things that have been on the table. i want to talk about a few of those, as soon as we come back. coming up, the republicans want a new formula for inflation, it's called chained cpi, it could slow the growth in payments to social security recipients, that's got some people mad. the president has said he could agree do it, but democratic lawmakers say no way. [ bells dinging ] ♪ hark how the bells, sweet silver bells ♪ ♪ all seem to say throw care away ♪ ♪ from everywhere, filling the air ♪ [ female announcer ] chex party mix. easy 15-minute homemade recipes you just pop in a microwave. like caramel chocolate drizzles. happier holidays. chex party mix. happier holidays. santho, ho, ho!anta! sa
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 3:05pm EST
relies on faith, and our side, especially in europe, seems to rely on materialism. this was a struggle of the human soul, chambers wrote, but we often seem to believe that the answer to islamism is simply more employment opportunities for saudi youth. we're, this a sense, in a position that we criticize the chinese leadership for having, but even here on the islamic question, chambers had interesting things to say. he wrote, quote, "the difference between liberalism and communism was in degree only." this question arose in the previous panel. continuing" they put faith in man rather than god and shared a common world view." there is a lesson here. chambers held we could not fight communism, bask with its near relation, liberalism. if 4e were alive, i think he would say we cannot fight extreme sharing a world view with it, namely, non-violent islamist extremism. if that's obvious to you, it's not been obvious to many governments around the world. the government of the united kingdom that spent a decade asking and promoting what it saw as nonviolent islamist extremist groups und
LINKTV
Dec 30, 2012 2:00pm PST
europe. at least at the 2013 predictions are borne out. she may have steered a steady course in the euro zone, a sovereign debt, and banking crisis, but the journey is far from over. >> problems will come again from the financial crisis. we do not know what state of emergency will pop up in the next year. the global economy. >> 2013 they also be the year when germany starts to feel what much of the world has suffered through, the pain of a
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 12:35am EST
try to get a sense of europe. they have got to find a way to work out all of their differences to save the euro. i believe they will. you can see it and feel it. they will find a way. they will muddle through, but they will find a way to get it done. these countries are also looking to us. test included a discarding of the old nation of communique's on issues about which we disagreed and patched over with language that was always misinterpreted and establishment of the arms control, human rights and -- human rights, arms control, regional issues and bi-la salle rail -- bilateral issues. it meant we didn't trade one interest for another. it was interesting how quickly people would say if the soviet union does something we don't like let's make them pay with a u.s. interest. as we got away with that with the new negotiating approach and made our way to geneva, we arrived with some sense of things being very different in the soviet union. one of the preparatory trips we had met with the one member who said, you know, as new leaders when we got to be in charge the cupboard was bare. i
FOX Business
Dec 25, 2012 10:00pm EST
deadlocked on how to resolve this crisis. noticed it, europe and arab nations are calling on a side to step down, loo but russia, chind iran continue to back assab. it states may well lose his status as the world's sole superpower by 2030. according to new report from the nationalst intelligence council. the united states to the obama intelligence rports suggestt wo will be first among equals as asia set to surpass north america and europe combined in terms of global power. joining us now to talk about implications for the foreign policy and wha in what is happen the middle east, john negroponte, the first director of national intelligence appointed by george w. bush serving five times as an investor and in his distinguished career in intelligence and diplomacy. great to have you with us. >> thank you. lou: let's start with the middle east. president morsi, ordering the military to arrest civilians. what is your reaction? >> i just think it is administration of the precariousness of the situation in egypt, but that situation is critical. we can't afford to see egypt go over some kind o
WETA
Dec 19, 2012 1:30am EST
go to europe. i am at my house on line and a headline pops up that says marcus miller in fatal switzerland bus crash. i am at my house, and i screamed. i had just talked to you, i had seen you days prior. i could not believe you had died in a bus crash. the driver of the bus did die. what was going on in switzerland. >> we had just finished and monte carlo, the jazz festival. at the show, we had a long trek to holland. that is about 3:00, 4:00 in the morning. i am starting to come up, and i feel like it is vertigo. the impact causes the bus to fall on its side. from all the people here, crashing into people, it was pretty crazy. after a while, the rescue workers came and got us. the guy was like 23 years old, these guys that are amazingly talented. i was terrified. i thought it would prevent them from playing or whatever. ours is going from guide to die. let me see you move your lips. where is the other driver? he did not make it. it was horrible. in my situation, it is really difficult. i was glad that the other guys are ok. everybody is home and recuperating. tavis: those of
CNBC
Dec 17, 2012 4:00am EST
. >>> and corporate news weighs on sentiment across europe. kpn shares fall after dividend and greco stocks plunges as analysts cut their outlook for the uk power group. >> okay. welcome. it's the start of a brand new week here on "worldwide exchange." and don't adjust your set, kelly and i are together. >> for once, for a day. >> but make the most of it because it won't be lasting. >> if only there were a slo-mo. >> i'm going to enjoy as much as i can of today. >> and likewise. and then we're going to have to get all of our u.s. voouers to find cnbc world because they could get three hours of you, carol and carolin for the rest of the week. >> whatever they can do. record it and fast forward to the good bits. >> yeah. >> it will be 2:00, 3:00 in the morning or whatever. >>> on today's show, plenty to come on. >> yes. the south american union faces ejection from the imf for allegedly cooking its books about the innation rate. we'll head out to europe where the swiss banking giants could be facing $1.6 billion over libor rate rigging allegations. >> and we'll be on the floor in beijin
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 6:00am EST
now. if you want to look like the way europe has been growing, we will have a small consolidation, such as the small consolidation proposed by the president. if you want to have the kind of growth that i hope we can have with a bigger consolidation, that one is being proposed by speaker boehner. >> thank you. >> i would like to focus on something that is probably more of interest to the economists and ordinary people. let's talk about ratios. what i heard you lay out, dr. zandi, was more of an ideal situation. they get you at roughly at $3 trillion. deficit-reduction over the course of 10 years. you went on to add the $1.20 trillion over last year's negotiations on the debt ceiling. the negotiations over last year's debt ceiling -- the new number would really be 1-1. that is not actually my question. i want to get to now. we have looked at the president's offer. we haven't found any spending reductions at all. we found the $1.6 trillion tax increases. the stimulus spending,we saw the extension of the unemployment insurance, which is an increase in spending. the delay in the spendi
SFGTV2
Dec 4, 2012 5:00pm PST
. central europe last year, budapest, the czech republic had gone from a leading country in central europe, leading the region in laws and in the constitution of equality 16 years ago to a complete reversal today. it's got one of the worst records today of the deprivation of rights of women, roma people, jews, and lgbt people. sound familiar, that grouping? i was not prepared for what i was going to find in budapest. i was not prepared for the thousands ofneo nazis and state sanctioned militia that would meet a couple hundred marchers, thousands of them. * there was one young man, 21 years old, young hungarian, who would be the only person to go on tv with me, only hungarian, malan would take a blow horn and walk through the streets against families that hated us, and he walked and he shouted and he kept the morale up as we were walking against this sea of people who didn't like us because we were representing the inclusion and diversity that we so much cherish here. he was inspired by the story of my uncle and he said to me, do you think this is how harvey felt? and i said to him, it's ex
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 6:00am EST
securitization around the world. the u.s. is a heavy user of credit products. europe is a distant second. it gives you a backdrop of the credit availability. this gives you some backdrop that the markets in the united states have come back to an extent if you look at the various asset classes. not as many people buying cars. the market is functioning. most of the student loans are going under the government's balance sheet. different loan obligations -- this data is a little bit old. $50 billion and that market is rapidly returning. this is the slide that everybody talks about, the dramatic change in how mortgage credit is made in the united states over the past six years. securitization of volumes have gone up by $300 billion in the past six years. private credit is a huge volume. $700 billion put through the private label security system. $22 billion is overstating it. of all the slides i have, this is the most telling about where the credit is coming from. it's coming to fannie and freddie and fha. 90% of loans are effectively being guaranteed by the government. it is not just
CNBC
Dec 3, 2012 6:00am EST
happening in europe, you'll see a similar story there. actually a little stronger gains. in france, the cac up by about two-thirds of 1%. in germany, the dax up by 0.4% and ftse in london is up by a quarter percent. in asia overnight, you did see the hang seng down by about 1.2%. shanghai composite down, as well, down by 1%. in consider rea, the kospi up by 0.6%. oil prices have been a little weaker. down by about seven crept cents. and ten year note yielding 1.61%. that's been stuck in a tight range for quite a while. take a look at the dollar this morning. you'll see the euro at this point is still above 1.30, 1.3029 even though the dollar down across the board. dollar-yen at 82.10. gold prices this morning are up by about $8. as the fiscal cliff approaches, we're wondering what we can expect from the markets. our guest hosts again barry knapp and richard bernstein. barry, you're concerned about the direction the talks have taken. >> yeah, it's interesting as i actually traveled through europe last week, there is all this focus on the timing of getting a deal. but there is not ne
Current
Dec 13, 2012 5:00pm PST
between the u.s. and europe has produced almost no innovation. we produce almost all of it. we pulled their growth rate up because of the success in the united states. >> eliot: jeff, i'll get to you in ten seconds. if taxes were 100%, people would theoretically sit at home. when we're talking about a rise from 35% to 39% -- >> they sit at home in europe. >> eliot:, here we have a database to say what has happened when we move them marginally from 35% to 39.6%. they were created when the rates were at 39.6%. i don't see the causation. >> i think your viewers have to be very aware of the nature of these academic studies. there have been leading economists who have looked at this inside and out. the congressional research service, i believe was asked by the republicans to take that down. they cannot find a correlation between higher tax rates and slower economic growth. just let me finish, okay? clinton raised the tax -- people like feldstein and barro to do the arithmetic will undermine economic growth, be predicted a recession. we did not get a recession. let's look at the empirical f
FOX News
Dec 3, 2012 1:00pm PST
weaker economy. the road map is greece, italy, spain, all over europe but the president thinks you can tax-and-spend your way to prosperity. >>neil: what the administration throws back on the issue is take a look at italy and greece, austerity has worked. you say what? >>guest: they have a strange definition. alwaysst either to them means higher taxes in europe and the united states austerity means less spending. i am in favor of the right definition of austerity. the balkan countries got out of the mess and now they are doing well economically because they cut, not just cut spending in the washington sense of increasing it at a slower rate they spent less one year after the other and now they are out of the trouble. if you understand the right definition of austerity is the way to go, the problem is in most of europe it means higher taxes, obama wants to give us the bad part of europe, without the good part. >>neil: thank you very much. they are not cutting anything. just slowing the growth. rebound and former president bill clinton hitting the links. this is a photo from last year. w
CNBC
Dec 13, 2012 11:00pm EST
robust than any time in the 16 1/2 years i have been with the company. >> let's talk about europe. you mentioned emerging markets, but have you a big exposure to europe. stock markets going up, but no economic activity to speak of. is that where the economic activity not picking up yet for you guys either? >> yeah, when you look at last season, the last lawn and garden season, it was down somewhere in the neighborhood of about 15% of the the market overall, and that was really reflective, obviously of decreased consumer spending and people feeling a lot of the impacts of macroeconomic conditions in europe. as we look forward, into europe, into this next season, we're calling it flat, simply because there are is so much uncertainty going on over there with how they solve their economic problems. at the same time, geographic diversification is really important for us, especially in the emerging markets. last week, friday, we closed on a deal down in brazil, one of the key markets we look at from an emerging market standpoint, a company by the name of bronco, which does a lot of high
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 6:00pm EST
of kept the atlantic between them. he would go off to europe in the spring and summer with a party of friends and travel around, often--sometimes he would take one of his daughters, and then later, he would take a mistress. and when he came back from europe, he would send his wife abroad in the fall and winter with one of their daughters and a chauffeur and a paid companion. so pretty much, they lived separate lives after about 1880. c-span: did they ever divorce? >> guest: no. divorce was really not an option in that world. some people did, but it was very scandalous and shocking. and interestingly enough, it was always--the women were--it was more disruptive for the woman. women were objects of scandal, even if they had done nothing wrong. and a couple of the people the morgans knew who d--women who did get divorced, moved to europe, just because it was a much more accepting, forgiving society. and also, i think, in professional terms, morgan was a conservative banker with a reputation for integrity. divorce didn't figure into that picture. c-span: this picture right here is of whic
FOX News
Dec 1, 2012 1:00am PST
new front in terms of drug dealing? it is africa. the route is from south america to africa, to europe. where is the new al qaeda organizations? where are they budding? where are they really being troublesome? witness benghazi, northern and western africa. that's where we fear al qaeda is taking root. what is the biggest fear? biggest fear is al qaeda northern africa and western after africa will become drug dealers. part of that cocaine movie in south america to europe getting the proceeds and thereby funding their terrorist activity. jump cut to this case involving these three men from maly. operating in maly and ghana. our d.n.a. informant contacts one of the local thugs who is said to have some association with al qaeda and says hey, guy, i have got a coke deal. i have got to get cocaine, tons of cocaine from south america here to maly and guana and south africa and up to europe. you al qaeda help me. you al qaeda will become part of my drug empire. >> operation. >> so what happens is the guy was not an actual drug dealer. he was a sting, a dia operator. the main contact point the
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 12:15am EST
agenda because they are developing. in southern europe, northern europe or different forms, in northern europe, the government believes in a strong social safety nets, believe in paying for health care, believe in playing a role in determining what businesses succeed or fail and yet those governments have budgets that are balanced and growing faster than we are and creating more jobs than we are. we have to be a little bit careful when we as we sometimes do in the united states that are high horse and say we understand capitalism, actually what is going on in the world is a competition between different versions and if our version produces more in the quality and less growth is seen as less fair, and others are seen as more fair and are producing more growth, who do you think is going to win that argument? >> host: a lot of people would say the northern european countries are socialist. is socialism a term that is outdated? >> guest: i think it is. let's take an example that is big in the election campaign. car companies going bankrupt during the last cycle, america is the big
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